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National primary prevention report 2: Exploring collaboration, networks and techniques for effective practice

July 2021 / 45 minutes

Key terms

  • Primary prevention
  • Prevention strategies
  • Coordination
  • Collaboration
  • Networks
  • Organisational development
  • Whole-of-organisation

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Executive summary

Strong foundations of primary prevention of violence against women, that is addressing the underlying drivers of this violence through whole-of-population efforts, have been built across the country. In this second report delivered by the National Primary Prevention Hub (the Hub) project, we explore some of these foundations and emerging lessons about effective and impactful prevention practice.

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The first Hub report provided an overview of the background and context to the project.1 It provided an overview of primary prevention in Australia by taking stock of the current state of prevention in Australia including policy context, the prevention workforce, and an overview of prevention activity across the country. It also examined the impact of COVID-19 on work towards the primary prevention of violence against women by providing information about the considerations for and examples of how prevention work was being adapted in the COVID context.

Building on the first report, this second report examines key themes that are central to the delivery of the Hub’s strategic ambitions of supporting information-sharing enabling connection and collaboration, and facilitating coordination among organisations designing and delivering primary prevention in Australia. These are also strategic ambitions of the National Plan,2 Fourth Action Plan,3 and Change the story.4

It focuses on two key themes:

  1. A better understanding of coordination, collaboration and networks
  2. Organisational development to prevent violence against women

The first theme examines the kinds of coordination, collaboration and networks that currently exist among those working on the primary prevention of violence against women in Australia. The report considers examples and approaches to provide an overview of the landscape. While the first national primary prevention report provided an analysis of how national, state and territory frameworks provide a degree of coherence to primary prevention work, in this report we take a different approach.

We focus primarily, but not exclusively, on local networks and collaborations. We do this to consider how ‘ground up’ approaches that meet the needs of their communities are central to the development of any larger coordination processes. Having a better understanding of how these networks and collaborations work at the local level provides important insight to enable the Hub project to build from the strength of this basis, to provides opportunities for building a deeper understanding about connecting coordination at the local, regional, state and federal levels in future work through the Hub.

The second theme of organisational development is critical to the success of the prevention of violence against women. We know that we need to change the culture of the organisations that all of us engage with every day if we are to make sustained reductions in gendered violence. This includes workplaces, schools, sites where we participate in sport and exercise, health settings, and a range of other organisations. The report considers some of the recurrent important practice elements that emerge when discussing organisational change, including how to support the readiness of an organisation, taking a whole-of- approach, and preparing for resistance and backlash. In this section we have also looked at ‘ground up’ approaches as well as others that tend to be led more from the top. We have done this to demonstrate the many ways in which change occurs, and to examine the many possible opportunities for building on successful approaches to organisational change.

Organisational change takes time and resources, but it is achievable, and small gains are made along the way. There is currently significant momentum in Australia to make our organisations safer and more equitable, and it is important to build on this momentum to make lasting change.

This report has been developed utilising several information gathering and synthesising processes. Peer reviewed and grey literature was reviewed, although not systematically.i Stakeholders working in primary prevention and gender equality initiatives provided us with information on projects and programs. In addition, information about practice was found through review of material such as grant recipient announcements, newsletters and sector communications. Reflections on key issues and developments in work towards the primary prevention of women were provided from key stakeholders including members of the Hub Stakeholder Group and colleagues at Our Watch.

The Hub team would like to thank everyone who contributed their time and expertise to this report.

Key points

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A better understanding of coordination, collaboration and networks

Organisational development to prevent violence against women

Conclusion

Endnotes

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1

Our Watch (2020). National primary prevention report: Report https://www.ourwatch.org.au/ report/national-primary-prevention-report.

2

Council of Australian Governments (2010). National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

3

Council of Australian Governments (2019). Fourth Action Plan (2019-2022) of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

4

Our Watch, Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS) and VicHealth (2015). Change the story: A shared framework for the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia.

5

State of Victoria (2021). Royal Commission into Victoria’s Mental Health System, Final Report, Volume 2: Collaboration to support good mental health and wellbeing, Parl Paper 202, Session 2018–21 (document 3 of 6); Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) (2018). Top 10 public health successes over the last 20 years, PHAA Monograph Series No. 2, Canberra.

6

Our Watch, ANROWS and VicHealth (2015). Change the story, p. 48.

7

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (2020). Working across sectors to meet the needs of clients experiencing domestic and family violence (ANROWS Insights, 05/2020). Sydney: ANROWS; Breckenridge, J., Rees, S. Valentine, K., Murray. S., (2016). Meta-evaluation of existing interagency partnerships, collaboration, coordination and/or integrated interventions and service responses to violence against women: Key findings and future directions Sydney: ANROWS.

8

State of Victoria (2016). Royal Commission into Family Violence: Summary and recommendations, Parl Paper No 132 (2014–16); Special Taskforce on Domestic and Family Violence in Queensland. (2015). Not Now, Not Ever: Putting an end to domestic and family violence in Queensland taskforce report, pp. 11-13.

9

Our Watch, ANROWS and VicHealth (2015). Change the story, p. 48.

10

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (2020). Working across sectors to meet the needs of clients experiencing domestic and family violence (ANROWS Insights, 05/2020). Sydney: ANROWS; Breckenridge, J., et al. (2016). Meta-evaluation of existing interagency partnerships, collaboration, coordination and/or integrated interventions and service responses to violence against women: Key findings and future directions Sydney: ANROWS.

11

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (2020). Working across sectors to meet the needs of clients experiencing domestic and family violence (ANROWS Insights, 05/2020). Sydney: ANROWS.

12

Our Watch (2020). National primary prevention report: Report 1. https://www.ourwatch.org.au/ report/national-primary-prevention-report.

13

Our Watch, ANROWS and VicHealth (2015). Change the story, p. 52.

14

Kania, and Kramer, M. (2011) ‘Collective Impact’. In Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter, pp. 36-41.

15

16

Our Watch (2020). National primary prevention report: Report 1 https://www.ourwatch.org.au/ report/national-primary-prevention-report.

17

Our Watch (2019). Change the story three years on: Reflections on uptake and impact, lessons learned and Our Watch’s ongoing work to embed and expand the evidence on prevention, 20; Our Watch (2017). Putting the prevention of violence against women into practice: How to Change the story, https://handbook.ourwatch.org.au.

18

Our Watch (2019). Change the story three years on: Reflections on uptake and impact, lessons learned and Our Watch’s ongoing work to embed and expand the evidence on prevention, p. 11.

19

Rainbow Health Victoria (2020). Pride in prevention evidence guide. https://rainbowhealthvic.org.au/ research-resources.

20

Rainbow Health Victoria (2020). Pride in prevention evidence https://rainbowhealthvic.org.au/ research-resources.

21

Tucci, J., Mitchell, J., Lindeman, M., Shilton, L. and Green, J. (2017). Strengthening Community Capacity to End Violence: A Project for NPY Women’s Council. NPY Women’s Council and Australian Childhood Foundation, Alice Springs http://www.npywc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Strengthening- Community-Capacity-to-End-Violence-26june18.pdf.

22

For more information see: http://natsiwa.org.au.

23

Breckenridge, J., et al. (2016). Meta-evaluation of existing interagency partnerships, collaboration, coordination and/or integrated interventions and service responses to violence against women: Key findings and future Sydney: ANROWS.

24

25

For more information see: https://orangedoor.vic.gov.au.

26

27

Breckenridge, J et al. (2016). Meta-evaluation of existing interagency partnerships, collaboration, coordination and/or integrated interventions and service responses to violence against women: Key findings and future Sydney: ANROWS.

28

30

Our Watch, ANROWS and VicHealth (2015). Change the story, p. 15.

31

State of Victoria (2021). Royal Commission into Victoria’s Mental Health System, Final Report, Volume 2: Collaboration to support good mental health and wellbeing, Parl Paper 202, Session 2018–21 (document 3 of 6).

32

33

Ninnes, P., and Koens, C. (Eds.) (2019). Preventing domestic and family violence: Action research reports from five Australian local government councils (ANROWS Insights, 06/2019). Sydney: ANROWS.

34

See for example: Michau, and Namy, S. (2021). SASA! Together: An evolution of the SASA! approach to prevent violence against women. Evaluation and Program Planning, p. 86.

35

For details of each of the women’s health services and their prevention plans go to: https://www. org.au/take-action/services-regional-action.

36

Women’s Health Loddon Mallee. (2020). Collective Action for Respect and Equality (CARE) Framework Loddon Mallee 2020-2025. http://whlm.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Womens- Health-Loddon-Mallee-CARE-Framework.pdf.

37

39

Bartel, D. (2018). Practice Brief: Training and mentoring community facilitators to lead critical reflection groups to prevent violence against women. The Prevention Collaboration. https:// prevention-collaborative.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/PRACTICE-BRIEF_Training-and-Mentoring- 220818-Low-Res.pdf; Wegner-Trayner, E and B. (2015). Introduction to communities of practice: A brief overview of its concept and uses. https://wenger-trayner.com/introduction-to-communities-of- practice; Domestic Violence Resource Centre (2020). Learning Together: Strengthening approaches to primary prevention through Communities of Practice.

40

Bartel, (2018). Practice Brief: Training and mentoring community facilitators to lead critical reflection groups to prevent violence against women. The Prevention Collaboration.

41

Wegner-Trayner, E and B (2015). Introduction to communities of practice: A brief overview of its concept and uses. https://wenger-trayner.com/introduction-to-communities-of-practice.

42

Wegner-Trayner, E and B (2015). Introduction to communities of practice: A brief overview of its concept and uses. https://wenger-trayner.com/introduction-to-communities-of-practice.

43

Curnow, J. (2013). Fight the power: situated learning and conscientisation in a gendered community of practice. Gender and Education, 25(7), pp. 834-850.

44

Koleth, M., Serova, N., & Trojanowska, B. K. (2020). Prevention and safer pathways to services for migrant and refugee communities: Ten research insights from the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Projects with Action Research (CALD PAR) initiative (ANROWS Insights, 01/2020). Sydney, NSW: ANROWS.

45

Koleth, M., et al. (2020). Prevention and safer pathways to services for migrant and refugee communities: Ten research insights from the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Projects with Action Research (CALD PAR) initiative (ANROWS Insights, 01/2020). Sydney, NSW: ANROWS.

46

For more information see: https://www.dvnsw.org.au/collaborations.

47

NSW Ministry of (2016) Domestic and Family Violence Blueprint for Reform 2016-2021. NSW Government. https://www.women.nsw.gov.au/strategies/nsw-domestic-and-family-violence/domestic- and-family-violence-blueprint.

48

Kerr-Wilson, A., Gibbs, A., McAslan Fraser E., Ramsoomar, L., Parke, A., Khuwaja, HMA., and Jewkes, (2020). A rigorous global evidence review of interventions to prevent violence against women and girls, What Works to prevent violence among women and girls global Programme. Pretoria, South Africa.

49

Our Watch, ANROWS and VicHealth (2015). Change the story, p 43.

50

For more information see: https://thisgirlcan.com.au.

51

For more information see: https://www.gettingwomenactive.com.au.

52

VicHealth (2020). Annual Report 2019-20, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, Melbourne.

53

Our Watch (2020). Tracking progress in prevention: A national monitoring report on progress towards the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia.

54

Michau, and Namy, S. (2021). SASA! Together: An evolution of the SASA! approach to prevent violence against women. Evaluation and Program Planning, p. 86.

55

See for example: Forsdike, K., Hooker, L., Seal, E., O’Sullivan, G., Ison, J. (2020). Respect Victoria Evidence Review, Centre for Sport and Social Impact, La Trobe University; Kerr-Wilson, A. et al. (2020). A rigorous global evidence review of interventions to prevent violence against women and girls, What Works to prevent violence among women and girls global Pretoria, South Africa.

56

Our Watch, ANROWS and VicHealth (2015). Change the story, p. 23.

57

Our Watch (2018) Changing the picture: A national resource to support the prevention of violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children, https://www.ourwatch.org. au/resource/changing-the-picture, p. 10.

58

Flood, M., Dragiewicz, M., and Pease., M. (2020). Resistance and backlash to gender equality. Australian Journal of Social Issues: 00: 1-16. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajs4.137; (2018). (En)countering resistance: Strategies to respond to resistance to gender equality initiatives, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, Melbourne.

59

Our Watch (2021). Respectful relationships education as part of a national approach to preventing gender-based violence: A brief for policy makers, p. 11.

60

61

62

63

Our Watch (2021). Respectful relationships education in schools: Evidence paper. https:// media-cdn.ourwatch.org.au/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/29130252/RRE-Evidence-paper-accessible-100321.pdf, Our Watch (2021). Educating for Equality: A model to address gender-based violence at, and through Australian universities. https://media-cdn.ourwatch.org.au/wp-content/ uploads/sites/2/2021/03/03162916/1.1-Educating-for-Equality.pdf, Liston, R., Mortimer, S., Hamilton, G. and Cameron, R. (2017). A team effort: preventing violence against women through sport. Evidence Guide prepared for Our Watch. Melbourne: RMIT University.

64

Our Watch (2021). Respectful relationships education in schools: Evidence paper. https:// media-cdn.ourwatch.org.au/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/29130252/RRE-Evidence-paper- accessible-100321.pdf.

65

Educating for Equality: A model to address gender-based violence at, and through Australian https://media-cdn.ourwatch.org.au/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/03162916/1.1- Educating-for-Equality.pdf.

66

Australian Human Rights (2020). Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices): Securing Our Rights, Securing Our Future Report, p. 529.

67

Ibid, p. 521.

69

VicHealth (2018). (En)countering resistance: Strategies to respond to resistance to gender equality initiatives, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, p. 4.

70

VicHealth (2018). (En)countering resistance: Strategies to respond to resistance to gender equality initiatives, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, p. 6.

72

73

For more information see: https://communityrespectandequality.com.au.

75

For further information: https://workplace.ourwatch.org.au.

76

Hach., R. Aryal-Lees (2019) Workplace Equality: A Model for Preventing Violence Against Migrant and Refugee Women. Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health: Melbourne. https://www.mcwh.com. au/wp-content/uploads/Workplace-Equality_Resource-1.pdf.

77

Women’s Legal Service Victoria (2019). Sexism and Gender Inequality in the Victorian Legal and Justice Sector: Phase one discussion paper, Women’s Legal Service Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.

78

Women’s Legal Service Victoria (2019). Sexism and Gender Inequality in the Victorian Legal and Justice Sector: Phase one discussion paper, Women’s Legal Service Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.

80

81

Women’s Legal Service Victoria (2019), Sexism and Gender Inequality in the Victorian Legal and Justice Sector: Phase one discussion paper, Women’s Legal Service Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.

82

For further information: https://www.awatw.org.au.

83

Australian Human Rights Commission (2020). Respect@Work: National inquiry into sexual harassment in Australian workplaces, pp 138-139.

84

Australian Government (2021). A Roadmap for Respect: Preventing and Addressing Sexual Harassment in Australian Workplaces.

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