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Group of colleagues with a woman looking concerned
What to do
at work

At work, disrespect can be talking over women, implying women are less capable than men, or sexualized comments. 

  • Show you don’t agree by not laughing along to a sexist joke.

  • Support women by talking to your manager or HR.

  • Speak up using your workplace’s values e.g. ‘Our office is great because we don’t do that’.

Want more? Read these work suggestions, and Our Watch’s Workplace Equality and Respect helps organisations embed gender equality.

Person at a desk using their laptop
What to do
online

Disrespect online can be posts made by other people, or comments on your own posts. 

  • Show your support by retweeting/liking comments that respect women or call out disrespect.

  • Support women by reporting disrespect to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter.

  • Speak up by commenting or messaging the disrespectful person with a meme, an article, or letting them know you’re not on board.

Woman walking alone on a busy street
What to do
in public

Disrespect on the street, transport and at venues can mean someone getting too close, staring and sexual comments, often claiming "it’s just a joke”.

  • Show it's not OK by moving between the disrespectful person and the woman.

  • Support women by asking if they’re OK.

  • Speak up by chatting to the disrespectful person to give the woman space.

While doing something about disrespect, don't you put yourself at risk by intervening in violence. Read why.